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Computer Science Colloquium: Dr. Mark Russo, November 6

On Friday, November 6 the Computer Science Department will host its final colloquium of the Fall 2015 semester.  Dr. Mark Russo, an adjunct professor with the department, will give a talk entitled “Big Data in the Chem Lab”.  An abstract of his talk can be found below.

Please join CS faculty and students in Forcina 408 from 12:30 – 1:30 PM for this talk.
Pizza and refreshments will be provided.

With the introduction of robotics and other forms of automation into the industrial chemistry laboratory it has become possible to monitor laboratory activities at a level of detail that previously has not been possible. In this lecture I will describe the information technology used to retrofit several analysis and purification laboratories at multiple geographic locations to capture, store, digest, and generate revealing real-time visualizations of chemist activities.  The architecture of the system necessary to ensure reliable delivery of event data will be described in detail.  Resulting visualizations of activities are collected into a chemist’s dashboard that is accessible through a web browser.  This dashboard has become a tool that chemists rely upon to carry out their daily activities and that managers use to make just-in-time resource and staffing decisions to ensure that their laboratories run in a highly efficient manner.

Mark Russo is an Associate Director in Computational Genomics at Bristol-Myers Squibb where he has worked on a broad range of information technology and automation projects that span the scientific disciplines found in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research.  Mark earned his PhD in Biochemical Engineering from Rutgers University where he studied the artificial intelligence in high performance computing.  Prior to joining Bristol-Myers Squibb, Mark worked at several pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies where he led groups with the mission of applying diverse technologies to solving problems in research.  He has also served as the Executive Editor for the Journal of Laboratory Automation and taught professional short courses in laboratory robotics, computer programming and image processing.  Mark has held adjunct teaching positions in the computer science departments of Drexel University, Bryn Mawr College, Rowan University, and The College of New Jersey.

Google Comes to Campus: October 7


Attention Students:  Google is coming to campus on Wednesday, October 7!

Come attend the Lightning Tech Talk and the “Meet N Greet” hosted by Google’s engineers.  Attendees will gain an understanding of the Google culture and opportunities, and will learn how to better prepare for corporate careers.  Refreshments will be provided.  Please note: all students who are interested in attending must upload their resume to LionsLink and complete the Google Form ( before October 7.

Time: 5:00 – 6:30 PM
Location: Education Building 212

Please see the event flyer for more information on these events.

Other Google Events on October 7

  • Women in Computer Science Lunch  (closed event)
    Time: 12:00 – 1:30 PM
  • One-one-One with a Google Engineer (closed event, application required)
    Time: 2:00 – 4:30 PM

Computer Science Colloquium: September 15

The first Computer Science Colloquium of the semester will be held on Tuesday, September 15.  Dr. Vinayak Elangovan, Visiting Assistant Professor in our CS Department, will give a talk entitled “Human-Vehicle Interactions (HVI) Recognition Using Spatiotemporal Analysis”.  An abstract of his talk can be found below.

Please join CS faculty and students in Forcina Hall 408 from 12:30 – 1:30 PM for this talk.  Pizza and refreshments will be provided.

Improved Situational awareness in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS) is an ongoing research effort of the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security. Most PSS generate huge volume of raw data (imagery data) and they heavily rely on human operators to interpret and inference data in order to detect abnormal activities. Many outdoor apprehensive activities involve vehicles as their primary source of transportation to and from the scene where a plot is executed. Vehicles can be used as a disguise, hide-out, and a meeting place to carry abnormal activities. Analysis of the Human-Vehicle Interactions (HVI) helps us to identify cohesive patterns of such activities representing potential threats. In this lecture, the approach used in detection and recognition of HVI activities are discussed. A taxonomy of HVI is developed for this approach, as a means for recognizing different types of HVI activities. HVI taxonomy may comprise multiple threads of ontological patterns. By spatiotemporal linking of ontological patterns, a HVI pattern is hypothesized to pursue a potential threat situation. At start of this lecture, an introduction to computer vision and machine learning is briefed for better understanding of the approach. The practical applications of this approach in various other domains are also discussed in this lecture.

Vinayak Elangovan (Visiting Assistant Professor of Computer Science) is an active researcher specializing in computer vision, sequential data analysis, and digital image processing. He earned his Ph.D. in Computer Information Systems Engineering at Tennessee State University (TSU). He continued his research and teaching as a Post Doc in the engineering department at TSU. He also has considerable work experience in engineering and software industries. His primary research focus is in the area of computer vision and machine vision with keen interest in software applications development and database management. He has worked on number of funded projects related to Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security applications.

CS Ice Cream Social: Wednesday, September 9

Attention: Computer Science Students

Please join members of ACM, WICS, and UPE at the Computer Science Ice Cream Social on Wednesday, September 9.  The event will take place at the Science Complex Fountain and will run from 1:30 PM – 3:00 PM. All Computer Science students are invited to attend.

We hope to see you there!

Spring 2015 Celebration of Student Achievement

On Wednesday, May 6, the Computer Science Department will host the Celebration of Student Achievement in Forcina Hall (4th floor).  All TCNJ students and guests are invited to attend the luncheon and poster presentations.

The schedule of events is as follows:

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM:   Department Luncheon

12:30 PM:    Computer Science Awards (FH 408)

12:45 PM:   Presentation of Goldberg Neff Award (FH 408)

1:00 – 3:00 PM:    Presentation of Posters & Project Demonstrations

3:15 – 3:45 PM:    UPE Induction Ceremony  (FH 407)

Please view the list of presentations and student evaluators for this event by clicking the links below.

Student Presentations Schedule

List of Evaluators

We look forward to seeing you on Wednesday!

Computer Science Colloquium: March 27

The first Computer Science Colloquium of the semester will be held on Friday, March 27.  Dr. André Bondi, Senior Staff Engineer at Siemens Corporation, Corporate Technology in Princeton will give a talk entitled “Methods and Processes for Ensuring the Performance of Software Systems”.  An abstract of his talk can be found below.

Please join CS faculty and students in Forcina Hall 408 from 12:30 – 1:30 PM for this talk.  Pizza and refreshments will be provided.

Performance is an essential and desirable attribute of any software system. Poor performance is a frequent cause of project failure, and can render a system difficult and undesirable to use. Despite this, it is often treated as an afterthought at many stages of the software lifecycle. The painful rollout of a well-known public web-based system in October 2013 underscores the resulting perils. In this talk, we discuss the role of various performance engineering techniques in ensuring the suitable performance of a software system. The choice of performance metrics is crucial to the development of testable performance requirements. The performance requirements influence architectural and technology choices for implementation. Performance models can aid in the planning of performance tests to verify that performance requirements have been met, while informing design and architectural choices that affect system performance and scalability. In this talk, we describe a performance engineering process and its role in the software lifecycle. We illustrate the talk with examples of the interpretation of performance test data in the context of performance models.

André Bondi is a Senior Staff Engineer working in performance software and systems engineering at Siemens Corp., Corporate Technologies in Princeton. His book on performance engineering, Foundations of Software and Systems Performance Engineering: Process, Performance Modeling, Requirements, Testing, Scalability, and Practice was published by Addison-Wesley in August 2014. Dr. Bondi has worked on performance issues in several domains of application, including telecommunications, conveyor systems, financial systems, medical systems, railway control, building surveillance and management, and network management. He has developed and taught corporate training courses on performance requirements and performance engineering. Just prior to joining Siemens, he held senior performance positions at two startup companies. Before that, he spent more than ten years working on a variety of performance, standards, and operational issues at AT&T Labs and its predecessor, Bell Labs. He taught courses in performance, simulation, operating systems principles, and computer architecture at the University of California, Santa Barbara for three years. Dr. Bondi holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in computer science from Purdue University, an M.Sc. in statistics from University College London, and a B.Sc. in mathematics from the University of Exeter. Dr. Bondi holds nine US patents.

Celebration of Computing: December 3

Come join the Computer Science Department for the Fall 2014 Celebration of Computing on Wednesday, December 3 in Forcina Hall (fourth floor).

Lunch will be served between 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM outside the student lounge.

From 1:00 to 3:00 PM, students who are enrolled in a mentored research or internship experience will present their capstone posters, while students in the Mobile Computing class will present their projects.  Make sure that you complete a student feedback form for the presentations you attend and deposit the forms in the boxes outside the Department Office (413) and Forcina 408 before you leave for the day.

Still not sure what to expect?  Check out some pictures from last year’s Celebration of Computing.  You can also email for more information.

Hope to see you there!

Spring 2015 Registration

Registration is here and upper level CS courses are filling up quickly! There are some seats reserved for CS majors in all the upper level courses. After your registration windows opens, if the class you need is closed, put yourself on the waiting list using the form here:

 Be sure to enter all the information requested.

As seats open up during the registration window, we will enroll students in order based on their registration times and time they registered on the wait list.

Email cs [at] tcnj [dot] edu if you have further questions.

Spring 2015 Registration Newsletter



Computer Science Colloquium: November 7

The third Computer Science Colloquium of the semester will be held on Friday, November 7.  Mr. Shawn Sivy, Director of Networking & Technical Services at TCNJ, will give a talk entitled “This Is Not Your Home Network: Understanding the Design of the TCNJ Wireless and Wired Networks, How They Work, and How To Get the Most Out of Them”.

Please join CS faculty and students in Science Complex Room P101 from 12:30 – 1:30 PM for this talk.  Pizza and refreshments will be provided.

Internship Information Sessions

The Computer Science Department will be holding two informational sessions about internships this semester.

Dates and times are as follows:

Wednesday, 10/29, 12 – 1 PM

Wednesday, 11/5,  6 – 7 PM

Both sessions will be held in Forcina 408.

If you plan on applying for an internship at some point in your curriculum, you must attend one informational session prior to submitting your application.  Additional info sessions will be planned in future semesters.  (If you don’t plan to do an internship as a capstone experience, you do not need to attend a session.)