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Colloquium Talk with Dr. Michael E. Locasto, November 15: An Operational Definition of Parsing (and its Consequences)

Dr. Michael Locasto, CTO at Narf Industries, will give a colloquium talk, titled “An Operational Definition of Parsing (and its Consequences)” on Tuesday, November 15 from 12:30 – 1:30 PM in the Library Auditorium.

See below for more information about Dr. Locasto.

Abstract: Narf Industries conducts advanced R&D in the space of vulnerability analysis, reverse engineering, and exploit development. This talk presents some our work conducted under the SafeDocs research program, which is concerned with how to make complex document formats safe to parse and consume. We will share our recent research on the unaddressed data management problem inherent in parsing (i.e., input language recognition) and how the problem might be addressed by the novel concept of dynamic progressive types. Far from being of interest to Computer Science theorists, the question of safe recognition is of utmost practical importance to software developers. Many kinds of vulnerabilities occur within input-handling code. The Language-theoretic Security paradigm (LangSec) posits that this association is not merely coincidental, nor is it due to simple ad doc mistakes. Rather, vulnerabilities and exploitation continue to occur because practical software engineering finds it difficult to take advantage of core Computer Science concepts of grammar definition, parsing, and language recognition. In this way, LangSec offers a “science of insecurity” by indemnifying consistent anti-patterns across many different vulnerabilities over time. Our work under SafeDocs shows how to use the latest tools in parser combinator libraries and format-aware tracers to define, guard, and monitor safe parsing.

Speaker Bio: Dr. Michael E. Locasto serves as the CTO at Narf Industries, a cadre of cybersecurity experts tackling some of the most important cybersecurity problems facing society, industry, and government. From 2016 to 2021, Dr. Locasto was a Principal Computer Scientist at SRI International in the Infrastructure Security Group of their Computer Science Laboratory. He served as a PI for four DARPA programs, and also co-led SRI’s Internet of Things Security and Privacy Center. Prior to joining SRI, he was a tenured Associate Professor at the University of Calgary, where he directed the Trustworthy Systems Group and conducted research in trustworthy systems, cooperative security mechanisms, and software security. Dr. Locasto has co-authored over 80 publications in the first of computer security, and he holds 14 U.S. patents related to software security and intrusion detection. He received his Ph.D., MPhil, and MSc degrees in Computer Science from Columbia University and graduated magna cum laude from The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) with BSc in Computer Science.

Colloquium Talk with Dr. Matthew Fronheiser, November 4: AI/ML in Medical Imaging: Improving Care with Technology

Dr. Matt Fronheiser, a scientific director at Bristol-Myers Squibb will give a colloquium talk, titled “AI/ML in Medical Imaging: Improving Care with Technology” on Friday, November 4 from 12:30 – 1:30 PM in Science Complex P-101.

See below for more information about Dr. Fronheiser .

Abstract: This talk will provide an overview of AI/ML applications in medical imaging, looking across the image pipeline from image acquisitions through patient diagnosis and risk stratification. Examples of clinically available technology will be discussed, with a focus on how these tools are changing the imaging workflow. This will be followed by a brief review of current research utilizing medical images to create prognostic and predictive models from large sets of clinical data.

Speaker Bio: Matt Fronheiser has over 15 years of experience in the medical imaging industry. He received his PhD from Duke University with a research focus on real-time 3D ultrasound. After receiving his degree, he spent several years performing optoacoustic imaging research for breast cancer. He currently works at a pharmaceutical company, Bristol-Myers Squibb, as a scientific director implementing imaging in clinical trials.

Spring 2023 Registration Wait-list

The registration period for Spring 2023 courses is November 1 – 11, 2022.  Some seats have been reserved for CS majors in all CSC courses.  Please review the Spring 2023 Registration Newsletter for additional information on options courses offered next semester.

After your registration window opens, if the class you need is closed, put yourself on the wait-list using the form below.

Be sure to read all directions and enter all requested information.

Spring 2023 Wait-list: https://bit.ly/3SXJ7oV

If you make changes to your schedule after entering your submission to the wait-list and need to update your information, email cs@tcnj.edu.

We will not start signing students into courses until Monday, November 14, after the registration window closes. Please do not email the department for updates before this time.  We will enroll students into any unfilled seats in order, based on their registration times and time they registered on the wait list.

Be sure that your intended course does not conflict with a course in your current schedule, and that you are willing to drop conflicting courses to make the change.  If you have a full course load or time conflict and do not indicate courses to drop on your wait-list submission, your submission will be disregarded.

As always, have a back-up plan in case you are not able to get into your preferred courses.

Please see the Advising Resources webpage for more information about submitting Mentored Research or Internship forms for Spring 2023


Links to other School of Science Department Wait-lists can be found below:

Biology: https://biology.tcnj.edu/resources-for/current-students/waitlists/
Chemistry: https://chemistry.tcnj.edu/waitlists/
Math/Stat: https://mathstat.tcnj.edu/ (link to form posted on the menu bar)
Physics: https://physics.tcnj.edu/physics-registration-faq/

For more information on waitlists for other schools and departments, please refer to the TCNJ Waitlisting Process packet.

Colloquium Talk with Dr. Roger Mailler, September 30: NSF Research Funding Resources for Undergrad Students

Dr. Roger Mailler, a Program Director at the National Science Foundation (NSF), will give a colloquium talk, titled “NSF Research Funding Resources for Undergrad Students” on Friday, September 30 from 12:30 – 1:30 PM on Zoom.

See below for more information about Dr. Mailler and links to the event.

Abstract: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) Program Director Roger Mailler shares knowledge and NSF resources with students at higher education. The NSF Computer and Information Science and Engineering at NSF supports investigator-initiated research and education in all areas of computer and information science and engineering, fosters broad interdisciplinary collaboration, helps develop and maintain cutting-edge national cyberinfrastructure for research and education, and contributes to the development of a computer and information technology workforce with skills necessary for success in the increasingly competitive global market. In this talk, Dr. Mailler shares opportunities in STEM Career Pathways for undergraduate students

Speaker Bio: Dr. Roger Mailler is a Program Director in National Science Foundation’s Division of Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS) under the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE). He leads many NSF-funded research projects in Robust Intelligence (RI) program within the IIS Division that aim to explore foundational computational research needed to understand and develop systems that can sense, learn, reason, communicate, and act in the world using AI, Machine Learning, Computer Vision, Natural Language Technologies, and Computational Neuroscience. Dr. Mailler is also a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Tulsa, published more than 60 articles in leading journals and conference proceedings in the area of multiagent systems, distributed problem solving, constrained optimization, and computational neuroscience. He received his bachelors degree at the State University of New York and Ph.D. at the University of Massachusetts, respectively.

Zoom Meeting ID: 922 3579 4660 / Passcode: 076165

https://tcnj.zoom.us/j/96195035078?pwd=OTZ4V3VkZHFPZ1p6aGphTnAwUXZ0QT09

The CS Department Welcomes Dr. Mark Russo, Senior Lecturer

Welcome back to Dr. Mark Russo, a longtime CS Department adjunct faculty member, who is returning this year in the position of Senior Lecturer!

Dr. Russo has taught a variety of courses for the department since joining as an adjunct in Spring 2015, including sections of CSC 220, CSC 230, and CSC 470 Special Topics course (Advanced Browser Technologies), as well as courses for Engineering majors.

This semester, Dr. Russo will teach sections of CSC 230: Data Structures and CSC 217, a course for Engineering majors which utilizes the programming language Python.

Find Dr. Russo’s research interests and contact information on his faculty profile page.

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